Friday, June 30, 2017

Get the latest bumper edition here!

HOT OFF THE PRESSES!
Get it here first! Latest edition just out!
36 pages of news, colour, views and insights!
Quality original journalism, about Ireland and abroad.
Plus Horace.
FLICK through the pages and DOWNLOAD THE FULL PDF HERE (5.8mb): http://bit.ly/CI-Issue57-36pages-June2017
Or, if you prefer to view on Issuu.com: http://bit.ly/CI-Iss57-flick-thru-pages

Made in Moyross. Est 2001.
The latest edition features:
- reaction to the State’s long-awaited recognition of Traveller’s ethnicity;
- encouragement to engage in civil disobedience from South African activist Kumi Naidoo (pictured below);
- reports of positivity by community groups nationwide, from Antrim to Killorglin, and indeed internationally.
- It also features Limerick student Emily Duffy’s sleeping bag for people who are homeless, which won an award recently.
The quarterly magazine established in 2001, is managed by a voluntary board of directors and is based in Sarsfield Gardens, Moyross.
CONTENTS
5 NEWS BRIEFS
6 HORACE / VSO appeal
7-9 COVER STORY: Recognition at last! What next?
10-11 INTERNATIONAL / X-BORDER: Winners
12-13 VOLUNTEERING: Sligo follows Barcelona
14 ENTERPRISE: Varadkar presents ICE awards
15-17 KUMI NAIDOO: Questions even he didn’t like
18-19 REFUGEES: A model welcome in Kilorglin
20 NEW COURSE / NEW GRANT SCHEME
21 WHAT’S NATIONWIDE & HAS 48 MEMBERS?
22-25 (& 34) SICAP 2: Community reps have their say
26 OPINION: Soft skills development is “critical”
27 GLOCAL: Think! What did you have for breakfast?
28 OPINION: Stop telling us (women) what to wear!
29 OLDER and BOLDER: by Dermot Hayes, aged 62+3/4.
30 COMMUNITIES ON CAMERA: Seeking change
32-33 AWARDS: Local authorities; Community winners
INDEPENDENT
‘Changing Ireland’ is an independent not-for-profit publication. 
ABOUT US
‘Changing Ireland’ engages in original journalism to highlight the impact of local and community development and social inclusion work across Ireland. We report on action on the ground and provide a space for reflection on what serves people and communities best.
The magazine was established in 2001, is based in Moyross, Limerick, and is core-funded by the Department of Housing, Planning, Community and Local Government.

Monday, June 26, 2017

YOUNG DADS LEARN THE ROPES


TEEN PARENTING


Read the full article in Issue 56 - Winter 2016/’17 of ‘Changing Ireland’!

 YOUNG DADS LEARN THE ROPES 



  When you hear the words “teen parent” the mind jumps to a scared young girl and an absent father. Yet, this is often not the case. 
Young dads from Ballyfermot discovered inner strengths 
and also that there’s no mountain, never mind any hill, 
that they can’t climb. These are not trips for the faint-hearted or softies!
A 2012 study by Crisis Pregnancy revealed that, in general, adolescent males who are parents believe they should take responsibility for the pregnancy and not leave everything up to their girlfriend (where applicable). Furthermore, given a range of preferences for the future, 38% of those surveyed wanted to stay with their girlfriend and raise the baby together. While surprising to some, this reflects reality. Almost a third of young parents are already cohabiting. 
Margaret Morris, co-ordinator of the national ‘Teen Parents Support Programme’, explains that keeping fathers involved in their child’s life is crucial, even if their parents’ relationship has ended.
MOTHER AND SISTER OF LATE CLODAGH HAWE LAUNCH FUND FOR WOMEN’S AID 
Read the full article in Issue 56 - Winter 2016/’17 of ‘Changing Ireland’!

The mother and sister of Clodagh Hawe 
who was murdered in her home last year 
alongside her three sons Liam, Niall and 
Ryan, have set up a fund in their memory, 
with all proceeds going to Women’s Aid.


The aim is to raise at least €50,000. “Clodagh was strong and beautiful inside and out and was so loving,” wrote Clodagh’s mother Mary Coll and sister Jacqueline Connolly. 
 “She was warm, loving, bright and capable and she was bringing her boys Liam, Niall and Ryan, up to have those same qualities. We want their deaths to help other women who are living in fear and isolation in their own homes.”
 “Please support our fundraising appeal for Women’s Aid. One in five women in Ireland experience domestic abuse and many women are isolated and alone,” said Mary and Jacqueline. The four were killed on August 31st by their husband and father Alan Hawe who afterwards killed himself.

Donations can be made online through this page: 
https://give.everydayhero.com/ie/in-memory-of-clodagh-liam-niall-and-ryan


FEMICIDE
209 WOMEN'S DEATHS
COMMEMORATED DURING
16 DAYS OF ACTION

  By December, 209 women had been murdered in Ireland since 1996 when Women’s Aid began recording figures. 
Marking the annual ‘16 Days of Action Opposing Violence Against Women’, Margaret Martin, director of Women’s Aid said: 
“Femicide must not be accepted as a fact of life. Women should be safe in their homes and in their relationships. And we must recognise the strong connection between the killing of women and domestic violence.”

Community workers,
 Researchers and Minister size up 
barriers/solutions
Read the full article in Issue 56 - Winter 2016/’17 of ‘Changing Ireland’!
Flick through the pages or download the PDF here: http://bit.ly/CI-Iss56-Winter2016-17

The 2016 annual Pobal Conference was held in The Helix threatre, DCU, Dublin, on the day after the world learned that Donald Trump had won the US presidential election.


Given the platform on which he stood and how he tapped into alienation among the working poor and those on the margins, Pobal’s conference theme was apt: “Creating an Inclusive Labour Market”. 
Unemployment in Ireland fell to 7.2% by January of this year, 0.1% lower than in November, However, unemployment remains high for groups such as refugees, Travellers and people with low formal education, while people who are unemployed for more than three years (termed “very long-term unemployed”) face considerable barriers.
The audience/participants and the many guest speakers – too many to mention – identified barriers and sought solutions to make employment opportunities more socially inclusive. 

CROSS-BORDER PROJECTS ALREADY NEED MORE SUPPORT
Read the full article in Issue 56 - Winter 2016/’17 of ‘Changing Ireland’!

Is the threat Brexit poses to communities being taken seriously?  
  Brexit poses a threat to the peace process on these islands. Support and funding for many community groups is at risk, despite the impact this could have.

   Anthony Soares (pictured right) told‘Changing Ireland’ in late 2016 that because of Brexit’s impact to date, cross-border projects already need more funding. And this was before political power-sharing collapsed at Stormont.
  In December, the House of Lords EU Sub-Committee deliberated on Brexit, saying an agreement should be drafted to “guarantee
open land borders and sea boundaries, support cross-border trade and preserve EU funding for cross-border projects”. The issue also received attention in December from the British-Irish Parliamentary Assembly, while An Taoiseach, Enda Kenny, has addressed the matter as being of the utmost concern.


The UK’s Brexit minister late last year visited Belfast and Dublin, meeting with political representatives and business leaders. He did not meet Community and Voluntary Sector representatives.
This sent out a strong signal to those in the Sector that the priority is trade, commerce and business.